• Tim Muddiman

B.D.K

Listening to Big Daddy Kane this morning. I bought this record when I was 12. I loved Hip Hop back then. Watching it grow from the early 80's to the very early 90's was a an incredible experience. Pre internet. I used to go to London on my own at 13 and buy records. I'd go to regular haunts ran by rastas and adults. I felt privileged to know they existed and was always welcomed and got to know a few dudes who were surprised a little white kid knew about this music. I'd stay up late and listen to any radio station that i could to find out what was going on. I'd go to the shops and try and sing or hum the baseline sometimes. It was harder then to find out the name of songs and sometimes it took a couple of years to hear a song again. Really precious times.


Another thing that excited me was the graffiti on the train lines and on the trains/tubes. It felt otherworldly. Id never seen that on TV. For a while i'd been building up a collection of Hip Hop Connection Magazine and would rush towards the back to see the Graffiti section. Hip Hop Connection was an American magazine and if i remember rightly most of the graffiti was from New York. *i think they had guest sections from around the world) It was connected to the music, to a society, to underground voices and cult. That was more appealing to me back then than anything I was being taught at school and what i saw on TV or 99% of Radio. Heres a few shots.




https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C9dqpxZef88

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